Spider-Man: Super Hero of the Marvel Cinematic Universe

 

Spider-Man is Marvel’s most beloved neighbourhood defender. Debuting in Amazing Fantasy 1962 #15, he recently joined the Super Heroes of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) on screen in Captain America: Civil War 2016.

As the gatekeeper of one of the world’s richest holdings of comic book narratives – more than 8000 characters developed over nearly eight decades – Marvel has been a dominant force in popular culture since 1939. ‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ begins with a display of those comic books that inspired the characters who inhabit the MCU, and includes the first comic book appearances of these characters including an original drawing from Amazing Fantasy 1962 #15 on loan from Prints and Photographs Division, The Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Wayne Nichols an acclaimed Australian comic book artist and commercial illustrator, best known for his work in the United States illustrating titles for Marvel Comics (The Incredible Hulk, Exiles), IDW Publishing (Orphan Black, The X-Files) and Dark Horse Comics (Star Wars: The Force Unleashed, Falling Skies) was commissioned to design the mural Homage to Spider-Man 2017 for the exhibition. Nichols captures the dynamism of Spider-Man swinging through the streets of New York City, a nod to the drawing process that still underpins comic artwork creation today.

NIchols introduces us to his mural Homage to Spider-Man which has been hand-painted directly onto the wall from his original drawing, and talks about his experience as a comic book artist.

DELVE DEEPER INTO THE EXHIBITION AND THE MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE

Go behind the scenes to experience more than 500 unique objects from your favourite films which offer a glimpse into the work of production designers, storyboarding and pre‑visualisation artists, costume and prop designers, and visual effects artists alongside the original comic books which introduced the characters and influenced the films.

CINEMA TICKETS | EXHIBITION TICKETS | UP LATE TICKETS | EXHIBITION PUBLICATION

Feature image: Installation view of Homage to Spider-Man 2017, ‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’, GOMA 2017 / Photograph: Natasha Harth © QAGOMA

Major survey at GOMA celebrates Yayoi Kusama

 

A career-spanning survey of work by leading contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama opens at GOMA in November. ‘Yayoi Kusama: Life is the Heart of a Rainbow’, co-curated by QAGOMA and National Gallery Singapore, is a wonderful journey through key moments in Kusama’s vast artistic career over seven decades. Now in her late 80s, Kusama is one of the most recognisable artists working today.

The survey explores key motifs in Kusama’s work since the early 1950s, her engagement with the body, and her expansive conception of space. It includes more than 70 works: early painterly experiments, a multi-decade presentation of the celebrated ‘net’ paintings, soft-sculpture and assemblage, performance documents, iconic ‘infinity rooms’ and large-scale installations from later in her career.

The exhibition culminates in an immersive presentation of Kusama’s most recent paintings from the visually arresting ‘My Eternal Soul’ series (2009 – ongoing). When Kusama began her epic painting series in 2009, she initially intended it to comprise 100 canvases. Still ongoing, the series of works now includes more than 500 paintings, 24 of the very newest of which are featured in the exhibition.

‘Life is the Heart of a Rainbow’ also includes two artworks by Kusama commissioned for the Gallery’s 2002 Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art. Narcissus garden 1966/2002 returns to the QAG Watermall while the Children’s Art Centre at GOMA presents the hugely popular interactive installation The obliteration room 2002–ongoing, a work that has been displayed at over 21 venues in 15 countries, and viewed by more than 5 million people.

QAGOMA’s long-standing relationship with Kusama and her Tokyo-based studio was established in 1989 when she participated in the exhibition ‘Japanese Ways, Western Means’ at QAG. Kusama’s practice was then the subject of an in-depth focus in ‘The 4th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’ (APT4) in 2002-03, and in 2011-12 a solo exhibition of her new and recent work ‘Look Now, See Forever’ was presented at GOMA.

Now, ‘Life is the Heart of a Rainbow’ offers a great overview of Kusama’s long and productive career, from the 1950s to today, drawing on QAGOMA’s holdings as well as collections in Japan and South-East Asia.

Feature image: Yayoi Kusama in front of Life is the Heart of a Rainbow (2017) ©YAYOI KUSAMA, Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore, Victoria Miro, London, David Zwirner, New York.

Cinémathèque Live will electrify GOMA in June

 

GOMA’s Australian Cinémathèque, the only Australian art gallery with purpose-built facilities dedicated to film and the moving image, will be electrified across three evenings by intimate performances combining projection, lighting and spatialised sound from some of the world’s most compelling experimental electronic and electroacoustic musicians.

Alessandro Cortini (Italy/United States), Grouper (United States), Lawrence English (Australia) and Xiu Xiu (United States) perform as part of the inaugural Cinémathèque Live program from Friday 23 to Sunday 25 June 2017. This is a unique opportunity to see the most exciting developments in contemporary electronic music.

It’s important to recognise that our body is also an ear; it just listens differently to acoustic stimulus.

Lawrence English

At 7.00pm on Friday 23 June Portland-based artist and musician Liz Harris (Grouper) performs with acoustic guitar and piano layered with ethereal vocals and cassette tape loops. Then at 8.00pm, Italian musician Alessandro Cortini, who records and tours with Nine Inch Nails as well as his own projects, will deliver aa expansive and hypnotic set.

Xiu Xiu, the American trio of Jamie Stewart, Angela Seo and Shayna Dunkelman, have added a second performance at GOMA at 5.00pm on Saturday 24 June, after their 8.00pm session sold out. Xiu Xiu’s Twin Peaks set was originally commissioned by QAGOMA to coincide with the 2015 exhibition ‘David Lynch: Between Two Worlds’. This captivating mix of post-punk and synth-pop, classical and experimental styles will now be performed for the last time in Australia, at the venue where it debuted.

Lawrence English

Cinémathèque Live concludes with two programs on Sunday 25 June. The first at 5.00pm features Klara Lewis (Sweden) and Sarah Davachi (Canada). The second program at 7.00pm features Lawrence English (Australia) and Elysia Crampton (United States) from 5.00pm onwards.

Cinémathèque Live is an exciting new initiative for the Australian Cinémathèque, building on its decade-long commitment to showcasing the work of influential filmmakers, international cinema, and contemporary artists working with the moving image.

Feature image: Alessandro Cortini

Bridge from North Shore

 

Margaret Preston is best known for the striking paintings and woodcut prints that she produced from the 1920s until the 1950s. Bridge from North Shore is a bold and decorative work and a fine example of the artist’s style during this period. Like the floral still-lifes the artist produced at this time, many details of the scene have been simplified. The linear textures of tiled roofs, bricks, wire and wooden fences, and the dominant form of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, have been reduced to create a dense mixture of decorative patterning.

Margaret Preston, Australia 1875-1963 / Bridge from North Shore c.1932 / Woodcut, hand-coloured on paper / Purchased 2003. Queensland Art Gallery Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © Margaret Preston 1932/Licensed by Viscopy 2017

O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington Smith: Making Modernism’ is on show at the Queensland Art Gallery until 11 June 2017 and is accompanied by an exhibition publication available from the QAGOMA Store.

CURIOUS TO READ MORE | VIEW Bridge from North Shore IN ‘MAKING MODERNISM’

The exhibition explores the intersection of three remarkable modernist painters who each used colour and abstraction to create a distinct, identifiable art. Even though they did not discuss their work with each other, North American artist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) and Australians Margaret Preston (1875–1963) and Grace Cossington Smith (1892–1984) shared a passionate curiosity for the natural world, and each worked within the emerging transcultural discourse of Modernism.

Presented by the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, and the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, in partnership with the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Gordon Darling Foundation.

QAGOMA appoints head of Asian and Pacific art

 

QAGOMA Director Chris Saines has announced the appointment of renowned curator Zara Stanhope as the Gallery’s Curatorial Manager of Asian and Pacific Art.

‘We are delighted to welcome Zara, who has over 20 years experience in curatorial and collection management in lead roles in art institutions in Australia and New Zealand.

Along with an expansive curatorial practice focusing on Australian, New Zealand and Pacific art, she will bring to the Gallery a great depth of strategic thinking, management experience and strong local and international networks.

As head of the Gallery’s dynamic Asian and Pacific art team, Zara will have responsibility for QAGOMA’s flagship exhibition series, ‘The Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’, and its world leading collection of contemporary Asian and Pacific art.’

Most recently Principal Curator and Head of Programmes, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki since 2013, Stanhope’s other experience includes Deputy Director of Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, inaugural Director of the Adam Art Gallery at Victoria University of Wellington and Assistant Director of Monash University Museum of Art.

Her curatorial practice spans more than 70 curated and co-curated exhibitions on Australian, New Zealand and international art and she is widely published. Exhibitions of note include ‘Ann Shelton: Dark Matter’, ‘Yang Fudong: Filmscapes (co-curated with Ulanda Blair), ‘The World in Painting’ (touring Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam and Australia), ‘Three Colours, Gordon Bennett and Peter Robinson’, ‘Slow Release: Recent Photography in New Zealand’ and 2016’s ‘Space to Dream: Recent Art from South America’ (with Beatriz Bustos Oyanedel).

Stanhope holds a PhD from Australian National University and an MA from University of London and is Adjunct Professor at both RMIT University Melbourne and AUT University Auckland.

Stanhope will commence at QAGOMA in August 2017.

Church interior

 

Church interior depicts Grace Cossington Smith’s family place of worship, St James’s Anglican Church in Turramurra, Sydney. The painting alludes to the impact of the Second World War on the home front by the absence of men of enlistment age in the congregation. Church interior exhibits the pure, singing quality of her finest paintings and the spirituality she found in the world around her. She wrote:

All form – landscape, interiors, still life, flowers, animals, people – have [sic] an inarticulate grace and beauty; painting to me is expressing this form in colour, colour vibrant with light – but containing this other, silent quality which is unconscious, and belongs to all things created.

Grace Cossington Smith

Grace Cossington Smith, Australia 1892-1984 / Church interior c.1941-42 (inscr. 1937) / Oil with pencil on pulpboard / Purchased 2001 with funds raised through The Grace Cossington Smith Queensland Art Gallery Foundation Appeal / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © Estate of Grace Cossington Smith

O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington Smith: Making Modernism’ is on show at the Queensland Art Gallery until 11 June 2017 and is accompanied by an exhibition publication available from the QAGOMA Store.

Curious to read More | View Church interior in ‘Making Modernism’

The exhibition explores the intersection of three remarkable modernist painters who each used colour and abstraction to create a distinct, identifiable art. Even though they did not discuss their work with each other, North American artist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) and Australians Margaret Preston (1875–1963) and Grace Cossington Smith (1892–1984) shared a passionate curiosity for the natural world, and each worked within the emerging transcultural discourse of Modernism.

Presented by the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, and the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, in partnership with the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Gordon Darling Foundation.