‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ opens at GOMA

 

QAGOMA Director Chris Saines today announced ‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ would open exclusively at the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) from Saturday 27 May until 3 September 2017. The exhibition is the first major Marvel exhibition in Australia and the largest ever presented in an art museum worldwide.

Curated by QAGOMA, the exhibition is drawn from Marvel Studios’ extensive archive as well as private and public collections including the Library of Congress, Washington DC. It will give audiences an unprecedented insight into the rich fictional world of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Rodney Fuentebella / Splash panel with Spider-Man / Keyframe for Captain America: Civil War 2016 / © 2017 MARVEL

‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ encompasses the entire ground floor of GOMA with more than 500 objects including more than 60 original costumes (worn by actors including Chris Hemsworth, Anthony Hopkins, Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr. and Tilda Swinton), comic books, props, spectacular set design, concept and keyframe art, clips from Marvel Studios films and bespoke hands-on interactives.

Must-see highlights include a large-scale diorama with costumes, props and clips from Captain America: The First Avenger, multiple versions of Iron Man’s suits, the imposing three-metre-tall Hulkbuster armour, and never-before-seen items from the set of Thor: Ragnarok including Hulk’s bed and the majestic Asgardian throne room.

Ryan Meinerding / Hulk versus Hulkbuster no.7 / Keyframe for Avengers: Age of Ultron 2015 / © 2017 MARVEL
Andrew Kim / Flying with Ant-thony / Keyframe for Ant-Man 2015 / © 2017 MARVEL
Charlie Wen / The Guardians no.1 / Keyframe for Guardians of the Galaxy 2014 / © 2017 MARVEL

The exhibition’s three key themes ‘The Cinematic Assembled’, ‘Decoding the Universe’ and ‘Behind the Scenes’ profiles legendary Marvel characters and their complex personas, focusing on Captain America, Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow and Hulk, as well as the Avengers, Ant-Man and Guardians of the Galaxy.

In addition to looking at the cinematic experience and the larger narratives at play in the films, the exhibition highlights the work of artists and creative teams behind the much-loved stories – including production design, storyboarding and pre-visualisation, costume and prop design, and visual effects.

Kevin Feige, Producer, Marvel Studios, said the company was thrilled to be working with QAGOMA to bring to life this unique exhibition.

The support we’ve received from Queensland and the country of Australia has been incredible. After filming ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ on Queensland’s Gold Coast we couldn’t think of a better location than GOMA to stage the largest Marvel exhibition ever.

Kevin Feige, Producer, Marvel Studios

Cinema
Throughout the exhibition season a retrospective of Marvel Cinematic Universe films will screen in QAGOMA’s Australian Cinémathèque including 2017 releases Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.2 and Spider-Man: Homecoming.

Open Wednesday night
The exhibition will open late until 9pm every Wednesday evening.

Up Late
Explore the exhibition after hours, be tempted by the food and drinks offerings, and enjoy a line up of live music from Art vs Science, Black Cab, Habits, Olympia, Models and NO ZU. Fridays 28 July – 1 September (5.30pm – 10.00pm).

Exhibition Shop
The dedicated exhibition shop offers an extensive selection of Marvel comics, publications, collectibles, accessories and an exclusive range of exhibition merchandise.

Publication
The exhibition is accompanied by a full-colour 240 page publication featuring essays by exhibition curator Amanda Slack-Smith, Associate Curator, Australian Cinémathèque, QAGOMA; Glen Weldon from National Public Radio’s Pop Culture Happy Hour; and Roxane Gay, editor, novelist and writer of Marvel Comics’ Black Panther: World of Wakanda (2016-); with an introduction by Thor: Ragnarok director Taika Waititi. The softcover version features cover art by Marvel Studios Head of Visual Development Ryan Meinerding, and the hardcover art is a newly commissioned piece by Marvel Studios Visual Development Supervisor Andy Park, inspired by Thor: Ragnarok. A limited edition box including the hardcover publication and a signed and numbered art print of the cover art by Andy Park (edition of 100) will be available in-store only from the Marvel Exhibition Shop from 1.00pm Friday 26 May 2017.

DELVE DEEPER INTO THE EXHIBITION AND THE MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE

‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ has been organised by the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) in collaboration with Marvel Entertainment. The exhibition has received vital support from the Queensland Government though Tourism and Events Queensland (TEQ) and Arts Queensland. The Gallery acknowledges the support of UNIQLO – Principal Partner and exclusive sponsor of ‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ Up Late.

Aboriginal still life

 

Margaret Preston returned to Australia from Europe in 1919 determined to develop a modern and distinctly national art. Indigenous art was integral to her campaign and, after 1932, when she moved to Berowra in the Hawkesbury Basin near Sydney and encountered local rock art, she embraced its restricted palette and geometric forms. Her appreciation of Indigenous art was sincere and enlightened for her time; however, the forms and motifs that inform the modernist style of this painting are displaced from their original cultural and spiritual contexts.

Margaret Preston, Australia 1875-1963 / Aboriginal still life 1940 / Oil on canvas / Gift of the Godfrey Rivers Trust through Miss Daphne Mayo 1940 / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © Margaret Preston 1940/Licensed by Viscopy 2017

O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington Smith: Making Modernism’ is on show at the Queensland Art Gallery until 11 June 2017 and is accompanied by an exhibition publication available from the QAGOMA Store.

CURIOUS TO READ MORE | VIEW ABORIGINAL STILL LIFE IN ‘MAKING MODERNISM’

The exhibition explores the intersection of three remarkable modernist painters who each used colour and abstraction to create a distinct, identifiable art. Even though they did not discuss their work with each other, North American artist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) and Australians Margaret Preston (1875–1963) and Grace Cossington Smith (1892–1984) shared a passionate curiosity for the natural world, and each worked within the emerging transcultural discourse of Modernism.

Presented by the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, and the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, in partnership with the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Gordon Darling Foundation.

Vale: Sydney Ball

 

We farewell Adelaide-born abstract painter Sydney Ball (1933–2017), who passed away in March. Ball moved to New York in 1962 where, through his studies, he was exposed to the rise of Abstract Expressionism, rubbing shoulders with Mark Rothko, Lee Krasner, Barnett Newman, Robert Motherwell and Willem de Kooning.

Returning to Australia three years later, he helped to bring hard-edge abstraction to the attention of Australian artists. In 1968, his work was an essential part of the influential exhibition ‘The Field’ at the National Gallery of Victoria. The subject of more than 70 solo exhibitions, Ball is represented in collections nationally and internationally.

Sydney Ball, Australia 1933-2017 / Byron Spring 1980 / Screenprint on wove paper / Purchased 1981 / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © The artist

His vitality and interest defined him; as Artshub’s Gina Fairley writes, he was always planning his next work with an infectious enthusiasm. Sydney Ball is remembered as a great teacher and phenomenal artist, whose legacy changed Australia’s art vision in the 1960s and will continue to influence future generations.1

Sydney Ball, Australia 1933-2017 / Pawnee summer 1973 / Synthetic polymer paint and enamel on cotton canvas / Acquired 1973 with the assistance of an Australian Government Grant through the Visual Arts Board of the Australia Council. Trustees’ Prize (winning entry) / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © QAGOMA

Endnote
1 Text drawn from Gina Fairley, ‘Vale Sydney Ball’, 6 March 2017, www.artshub.com.au/news-article/news/visual-arts/gina-fairley/ vale-sydney-ball-253306, accessed 9 March 2017.

NSW and West Australian banksia

 

NSW and West Australian banksia 1929 is one of a number of paintings by Margaret Preston in which she used the floral still life to bring attention to the natural world and landscape as a way of expressing place and the notion of ‘home’. The distinctive organic forms of the banksia and restrained use of colour were emblematic of Preston’s commitment to painting native flowers as part of her quest to create a uniquely Australian national art.

Margaret Preston, Australia 1875-1963 / NSW and West Australian banksia 1929 / Oil on canvas / Purchased 1972 / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © Margaret Preston 1929/Licensed by Viscopy 2017

O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington Smith: Making Modernism’ is on show at the Queensland Art Gallery until 11 June 2017 and is accompanied by an exhibition publication available from the QAGOMA Store.

CURIOUS TO READ MORE | VIEW NSW AND WEST AUSTRALIAN BANKSIA IN ‘MAKING MODERNISM’

The exhibition explores the intersection of three remarkable modernist painters who each used colour and abstraction to create a distinct, identifiable art. Even though they did not discuss their work with each other, North American artist Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) and Australians Margaret Preston (1875–1963) and Grace Cossington Smith (1892–1984) shared a passionate curiosity for the natural world, and each worked within the emerging transcultural discourse of Modernism.

Presented by the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, and the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, in partnership with the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, and supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Gordon Darling Foundation.

 

Stellar Up Late for Marvel

 

The Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) will present a stellar line-up of pop, electronica and rock across six Friday nights when ‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ Up Late kicks off from 28 July to 1 September 2017.

Live music from Australian acts Art vs Science, Black Cab, Habits, Olympia, Models and NO ZU will feature in the six week long program, which also includes a resident DJ, pop-up bars and talks in the exhibition space. This Up Late program offers audiences a unique after-dark experience of Australia’s first major Marvel exhibition – the largest ever presented in an art museum.

Doors open from 5.30pm with resident DJ Emma Stevenson spinning records in GOMA’s River Room, before the headline performers take to the stage on the following dates:

Each Up Late evening will feature local artisans delivering an ‘All in the Details’ talk where they will highlight and discuss the craftsmanship involved in some of their favourite pieces in the exhibition. Artisans across a wide range of creative fields will participate in the discussions, including blacksmith Robert Everingham, make-up artist Billie Weston, jeweller Bianca Mavrick, and textiles conservator Michael Marendy.

UP LATE TICKETS | CINEMA TICKETS | EXHIBITION TICKETS | EXHIBITION PUBLICATION

‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ Up Late is exclusively sponsored by global apparel retailer UNIQLO, also principal partner for the exhibition.

DELVE DEEPER INTO THE EXHIBITION AND MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE

‘Marvel: Creating the Cinematic Universe’ is organised by QAGOMA in collaboration with Marvel Entertainment. The exhibition has received additional support from the Queensland Government though Tourism and Events Queensland (TEQ) and Arts Queensland.

Feature image: ARIA award winning Art vs Science.

Vale: Win Schubert, AO

 

It was with deep sadness that the Gallery – and the greater Queensland arts community – said farewell to one of its greatest supporters and friends, Mrs Win Schubert, AO, following her recent passing.

Mrs Schubert was one of the most generous benefactors in the QAGOMA Foundation’s 37 year history. Her inspiring patronage – which spanned over two decades – enabled the acquisition of over 100 important works for the State Collection, many of which are visitor favourites. Who wouldn’t recall with delight Cai Guo-Qiang’s poetic and allegorical assembly of 99 animals, Heritage 2013; Yayoi Kusama’s Flowers that bloom at midnight 2011; or the recently displayed Kohei Nawa’s PixCell-Double Deer #4 2010?

Cai Quo-Qiang’s Heritage 2013, GOMA, 2013 / Photograph: Brodie Standen / 99 life-sized replicas of animals: polystyrene, gauze, resin and hide/ Commissioned 2013 with funds from the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Diversity Foundation through and with the assistance of the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © The artist
Yayoi Kusama’s Flowers that bloom at midnight 2011, GOMA, 2011 / Photograph: Natasha Harth / Fibreglass-reinforced plastic, urethane paint, metal frame / Purchased 2012 with funds from the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Diversity Foundation through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © The artist
Kohei Nawa, Japan b.1975 / PixCell-Double Deer#4 2010 / Mixed media / Purchased 2010 with funds from the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Diversity Foundation through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © The artist

These are just a few of the Gallery’s acquisitions made possible through her remarkable generosity. The last, and most significant acquisition made with Mrs Schubert’s support, was Nick Cave’s Heard 2012. This majestic work was brought to life with performances over summer that captivated thousands of visitors and were undoubtedly highlights of the celebrations for GOMA turning 10.

Mrs Schubert (centre) enjoying the performance of Nick Cave’s Heard 2012, GOMA, 2016 / Photograph: Chloe Callistemon / 15 wearable sculptures (six parts each) / Purchased 2016 to mark the tenth anniversary of the Gallery of Modern Art with funds from the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Diversity Foundation through the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © The artist
Performance of Nick Cave’s Heard 2012, GOMA, 2016 / Photograph: Chloe Callistemon

While Mrs Schubert generously supported a number of ambitious and engaging international acquisitions, her giving primarily focused on art from Australia and Queensland. Most outstandingly, her support through the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Foundation for the Arts enabled the Gallery to hold Australia’s most comprehensive collection of works by Ian Fairweather.

The Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Galleries, QAG, 2014 / Photograph: Joe Ruckli.

Mrs Schubert’s inspiring benefaction was acknowledged in 2012 through the naming of galleries 10-13 of the Queensland Art Gallery as the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Galleries, and again in 2015 when she was awarded the Gallery medal. Upon receiving the Gallery medal, QAGOMA Director Chris Saines, CNZM stated that ‘Her support continues to expand the distinct and enduring significance of art in our lives. We remain humbled by her generosity and moved by her dedication to the Gallery, to the arts, and to the Queensland community.’

In addition to recognition from QAGOMA for her enduring patronage, Mrs Schubert was also honoured by the State and Federal governments for the greater role she played in the development of art in Queensland. In 2014 she was recognised as a Queensland Great and also appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list. Mrs Schubert was also granted the keys to the City of the Gold Coast in 2015 for her ongoing contribution to Gold Coast arts and culture.

Those who knew the very private Mrs Schubert knew that her generosity was matched by her humility. The motivation for her giving was never to seek accolades or public recognition, but purely because she found great joy in sharing her passion for art. Mrs Schubert was unique and while her physical presence at the Gallery will be greatly missed, her legacy lives on through the many works her generosity helped to acquire.