Woods sculpture celebrated for its formal beauty

 

Consisting of 30 squared-off tree trunks elaborately carved with a chainsaw and arranged in an orderly open grid, Shigeo Toya’s Woods III 1991–92 (illustrated) on display at the Queensland Art Gallery until 27 January 2025 is celebrated for its formal beauty as well as its poetic and philosophical allusions.

For Toya, the recesses and crevices created by his chainsaw laid bare the internal material qualities of the wood. The act of carving is an inscription — evidence of the artist’s intervention through mark-making, and an excavation — removing accumulated layers to reveal what they might conceal.

Shigeo Toya ‘Woods III’ 1991-92

Shigeo Toya, Japan b.1947 / Woods III 1991-92 / Wood, ashes and synthetic polymer paint / 30 pieces: 220 x 30 x 30cm; 220 x 530 x 430cm (installed) / The Kenneth and Yasuko Myer Collection of Contemporary Asian Art. Purchased 1994 with funds from The Myer Foundation and Michael Sidney Myer through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation and with the assistance of the International Exhibitions Program / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art / © Shigeo Toya

Toya investigates the nature of sculpture, perception and materials, working almost exclusively with wood, particularly tree trunks. His best-known, and ongoing, series of works is entitled ‘Woods’, these take the form of a stand of squared-off trunks, set out in single file or as an open grid of standing trees.

The formal beauty of Woods III is its regular spacing intimating infinite space as an endless sweep of forest. The top of each trunk has incised parallel linear cuts with jagged edges that evoke twisted branches or foliage. The roughness of the cuts reveals the inner layers of the material; its interior comes to the surface.

The textures and patterning of the tops contrast with the sobriety of the solid trunks. This is further underlined through the rubbing onto the textured surfaces of the ashes of burned wood cuttings, as well as through the rivulets of acrylic paint that run down the trunks. Toya has developed a concept he calls ‘minimalbaroque’ to describe this relationship between patterned or Baroque complexity and minimal simplicity.

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Judy Watson surveys the rising tide of climate change

 

In this large-scale painting moreton bay rivers, australian temperature chart, freshwater mussels, net, spectrogram 2022 (illustrated) on display within ‘mudunama kundana wandaraba jarribirri‘ (tomorrow the tree grows stronger) at the Queensland Art Gallery until 11 August 2024, Judy Watson surveys the rising tide of climate change by representing a bird’s-eye view of Queensland’s Moreton Bay and its rivers, overlaid with a chart of Australia’s average air and water temperatures recorded between 1910 and 2019.

Queensland Art Gallery Watermall

Judy Watson, Waanyi people, Australia b.1959 / moreton bay rivers, australian temperature chart, freshwater mussels, net, spectrogram 2022 and walama 2000, 17 bronze sculptures installed in ‘mudunama kundana wandaraba jarribirri: Judy Watson’, Queensland Art Gallery Watermall, Brisbane 2024 / © Judy Watson / Photograph: N Umek © QAGOMA

Watson integrated this data with the knowledges of women close to her. With her nephew’s partner, Tor Maclean, she experimented with botanical-dyeing and stencilling. Aunty Helena Gulash spoke the Kabi Kabi word ‘gila’, meaning ‘light coloured native bee’ — represented here in the form of a spectrograms (visual representations of recorded sound). At her mother Joyce Watson’s home, the artist painted the spectrograms, while at her cousin Dorothy Watson’s home in Oxley — close to the flood-prone Oxley Creek — she dyed the work in indigo.

Three freshwater mussel shells, known as malu malu in Watson’s Waanyi language, are also represented in this work.

Judy Watson ‘moreton bay rivers, australian temperature chart, freshwater mussels, net, spectrogram’ 2022

Judy Watson, Waanyi people, Australia b.1959 / moreton bay rivers, australian temperature chart, freshwater mussels, net, spectrogram 2022 / Indigo dye, graphite, synthetic polymer paint, waxed linen thread and pastel on cotton / 248 x 490.5cm / Purchased with funds from the 2023 QAGOMA Foundation Appeal, Margaret Mittelheuser AM and Cathryn Mittelheuser AM / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art / © Judy Watson/Copyright Agency

Acknowledgment of Country
The Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the land on which the Gallery stands in Brisbane. We pay respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders past and present and, in the spirit of reconciliation, acknowledge the immense creative contribution First Australians make to the art and culture of this country. It is customary in many Indigenous communities not to mention the name or reproduce photographs of the deceased. All such mentions and photographs are with permission, however, care and discretion should be exercised.

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Paul Gauguin’s sculpture reflects his simplified painting style

 

On display within the Queensland Art Gallery’s International Art Collection, Philip Bacon Galleries (7- 9), the elegant contours of Paul Gauguin’s sculpture Madame Schuffenecker c.1890 (illustrated) reflect the simplified design that is so distinctive in his painting, and which was to become increasingly influential on the work of painters such as Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso.

The subject is the wife of Gauguin’s lifelong friend and fellow artist Claude-Emile Schuffenecker, Gauguin frequently used their home in Paris as a base, and Claude-Emile often assisted Gauguin both on a personal and financial level.

After pursuing a career in stockbroking, Gauguin turned to painting full time in the 1880s. He met Camille Pissarro in the mid 1870s and exhibited with the Impressionists in 1881 and 1882, but moved increasingly toward a symbolist style of bright colour and bold design. It is likely that this work was made just before the brief period when Gauguin relocated to Pont Aven, Brittany, to work alongside his friend Vincent van Gogh.

Paul Gauguin ‘Madame Schuffenecker’ c.1890

Paul Gauguin, France 1848-1903 / Madame Schuffenecker c.1890, cast c.1960 / Bronze / 44 x 32.5 x 18cm / Purchased 1982. QAG Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art

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Arthur Streeton: Romanticism & swimming in bush creeks

 

In Sir Arthur Streeton’s The bathers 1891 the artist has painted a group of four boys swimming in a creek, however under infra-red light we see there were originally more figures.

Streeton (8 April 1867-1943) significantly contributed to the way Australia imagines itself, the romance and beauty of his landscapes reflects the vision for Australian art at the turn of the twentieth century, highlighting the importance of country in this nation’s experience.

Streeton was seen as the hero of an ambitious beginning for Australian art, one that assumed it could discard conventional European art styles.

I want to be painting every day . . . I picture in my head the Murray and all the wonder and glory at its source up toward Koscuisko [sic] . . . and the great gold plains, and all the beautiful inland Australia and I love the thought of walking into all this and trying to expand and express it in my way.1

While this ambition established new pictorial forms, its impetus for a national art never wholly discarded imported methods of responding to the landscape, especially aspects of European Romanticism.

Arthur Streeton ‘The bathers’ 1891

Arthur Streeton, Australia 1867-1943 / The bathers 1891 / Oil on canvas / 31.2 x 62.6 cm / Purchased 1951. Maria Theresa Treweeke Bequest / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art

In The bathers 1891 (Illustrated), on display within the Queensland Art Gallery’s Australian Art Collection, Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Galleries (10-13), the boys swimming in a creek present a cultural archetype of Australians enjoying nature. Streeton, together with Tom Roberts, Frederick McCubbin, Charles Conder, Walter Withers and various non-artist friends, spent weekends and longer periods camping in locations around Melbourne, including Box Hill, Mentone and Eaglemont. It was during one of these trips that this work was painted.

Streeton and his friends were not the only ones journeying out of the cities to experience the unique Australian landscape. City-dwellers often travelled to the bush surrounding Melbourne to spend their leisure time picnicking, camping, sketching and painting. At the time, this relationship to the bush was seen as progressive, advancing the pursuit of a utopian existence.

The depiction of nudes, especially male nudes, in the Australian landscape highlights aspects of European Romanticism in Streeton’s attitude to the bush. The nude figures are testament to a utopian experience of nature, of humanity in a harmonious relationship with the environment. In the same period, Streeton painted several nudes of women, but mostly as nymphs in mythical and allegorical situations, experimenting with popular symbolist subject matter. These boys possess no such lyrical fancy; they are skinny and pale and turned away from the viewer, not heroically posed like Classical figures.

Interestingly is the discovery by Gallery Conservators that, under infra-red light, another two figures are apparent, one standing to the right of the group (Illustrated) and one swimming in the water (Illustrated). Was the painting altered by the artist, perhaps as a result of moral objections to the nudity of the figures?

X-ray revealing the two altered areas

X-ray composite of The bathers showing the two areas of altered figures

Edited excerpt by Angela Goddard, former Curator, Australian Art to 1975, QAGOMA

Endnote
1 Arthur Streeton, ‘Letter to Tom Roberts,’ 1891, in Letters from Smike: The Letters of Arthur Streeton 1890–1943, eds A. Galbally and A. Gray, Oxford University Press Australia, Melbourne, 1989, p.30.

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Fairy Tales: The promise of happiness

 

Fairy tales are not bound by borders, social class, custom, religion, age or time. They are products of our desire to consider the world around us from within the safe realm of fiction. Fairy tales come to meet us where we are; they shift and change to reflect the needs and wants of audiences. The hopefulness embodied in many fairy tales once functioned to alleviate the drudgery of daily life — they both entertained and imparted wisdom.

The classic tales of ‘Cinderella’ and ‘Snow White’ promised better times and, if this was not possible, at least concluded with satisfactorily gruesome endings for the wicked. These stories were written at a time when women’s autonomy and access to education were severely restricted and, according to the law, they were subordinate to their fathers or husbands. For early readers, ‘happily ever after’ represented the institution of marriage and a life of stability, free of strife and hardship.

Watch | Director Tarsem Singh’s filmic adaptation of ‘Snow White’

Courtesy: Relativity Media

Watch | Go behind-the-scences of Eiko Ishioka’s costumes

Courtesy: Relativity Media

When the Parisian aristocracy recorded these stories — with their ostentatious ballrooms and banquets, luxurious carriages, opulent dresses, expensive jewellery and impossible shoes — they evoked aspirational wealth, status and power. Marrying for love, and between classes, were risky topics for the time.

While the visions of adventure, community, happiness and love in wonder tales of centuries past still intrigue contemporary audiences, many stories today are being retold in ways that challenge patriarchal systems and imagine new, more equitable ways of living for all.

A romantic fairy tale requires a wardrobe to match. Dress is critical to the identity of many fairy tale characters: it indicates status or occupation, and signals magical transformation. For Japanese designer Eiko Ishioka the costumes for the queen in Mirror Mirror (2012) are a demonstration of power and wealth. The costumes worn by Julia Roberts as ‘Queen Clementianna’ are oversized and highly embellished, sculptural in form and bold in design and colour. For Ishioka, it was important to reveal aspects of the character’s personality and emotions, the gold thread and detailed embellishment is important and reflects Clementianna’s assertions in the film that gold is her colour. The eye-catching ‘Peach dress’ costume (illustrated) is intended to intimidate her subjects through its opulence and scale. Another stunning creation for Queen Clementianna, the ‘Green dress’ costume (illustrated) conveys the complexities of character through colour, which shows the depth of the queen’s envy of Princess Snow played by Lily Collins, the highly constructed and precise nature of the dress also reflects Clementianna’s attempts to conceal her true personality in order to woo the prince played by Armie Hammer.

Eiko Ishioka (designer) ‘Green dress’ and ‘Peach dress’ costumes

Tarsem Singh (director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Eric Winterling (costumier), United States / ‘Green dress’ and ‘Peach dress’ costume from Mirror Mirror (2012) installed in ‘Fairy Tales’, Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Brisbane 2023 / Collection: The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles / Photograph: C Callistemon © QAGOMA

Eiko Ishioka (Designer) ‘Yellow dress with hood’ costume

Tarsem Singh (Director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (Designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Production still from Mirror Mirror (2012) / © 2012 UV RML NL Assets LLC. / Photograph: Jan Thijs / Image courtesy: Relativity Media
(Left) Tarsem Singh (Director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (Designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Production still from Mirror Mirror (2012) / © 2012 UV RML NL Assets LLC. / Photograph: Jan Thijs / Image courtesy: Relativity Media / (Right) Eiko Ishioka (Designer); Tricorne Costumes (Costumier) / ‘Yellow dress with hood’ costume from Mirror Mirror (2012) installed in ‘Fairy Tales’, Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Brisbane 2023 / Silk taffeta, polyester, nylon tulle, synthetic taffeta / Collection: The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles / Photograph: C Callistemon © QAGOMA

Showcased in the ‘Fairy Tales’ exhibition are eight incredible creations by Ishioka, created for Mirror Mirror — director Tarsem Singh’s filmic adaptation of ‘Snow White’. Richly detailed and sumptuously executed, Ishioka’s costumes bring the impossible luxury of fairy tales to life and highlight the aspirational nature of stories in which characters rise above servitude to a life of privilege and financial security.

‘Fairy Tales’ unfolds across three themed chapters. ‘Into the Woods’ explores the conventions and characters of traditional fairy tales alongside their contemporary retellings. ‘Through the Looking Glass’ presents newer tales of parallel worlds that are filled with unexpected ideas and paths. ‘Ever After’ brings together classic and current tales to celebrate aspirations, challenge convention and forge new directions.

Travel with us in our weekly series through each room and theme of the ‘Fairy Tales’ exhibition at Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) as we focus on the stunning costumes from Mirror Mirror (2012) on display in Australia for the first time.

DELVE DEEPER: Journey through the ‘Fairy Tales’ exhibition with our weekly series

EXHIBITION THEME: 13 Ever After

Ishioka described her concept for Mirror Mirror as ‘hybrid classic’, an approach that allowed the designer to draw on fashions from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries to create the grandeur and whimsy of the fairy tale aesthetic sought by director Tarsem Singh. Ishioka led the creation of more than 400 costumes, as well as the purchase of and alterations to an additional 600 existing costumes. While many were completed by local costumiers and craftsman in Montreal, close to her studio and the film’s shooting location, the primary costumes were handmade in New York across four different ateliers; Tricorne Costumes, Jennifer Love Costumes, Carelli Costumes and Eric Winterling Costumes.

Eiko Ishioka (designer) ‘Cream wedding dress’ costume

The centrepiece of these extraordinary creations on display in ‘Fairy Tales’ is the exceptionally romantic ‘Cream wedding dress’ costume for Snow’s stepmother, Queen Clementianna. With its heavy layers of silken petals and vine motif, the garment has a vast circumference of 8.5 metres, weighs approximately 27 kilograms, and was designed to dominate the room.

Tarsem Singh (director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Carelli Costumes (costumier), United States est. 1982 /‘Cream wedding dress’ costume from Mirror Mirror (2012) installed in ‘Fairy Tales’, Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Brisbane 2023 / Duchess silk satin, Swarovski crystals / Collection: The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles / Photograph: N Umek © QAGOMA
Tarsem Singh (Director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (Designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Production still from Mirror Mirror (2012) / © 2012 UV RML NL Assets LLC. / Photograph: Jan Thijs / Image courtesy: Relativity Media

Eiko Ishioka (designer) ‘Swan dress’ & ‘Rabbit suit’ costumes

These are the first of two costumes created for Princess Snow (Snow White) and her handsome beau, Prince Alcott. Worn during the film’s masquerade ball scene, the princess’s ‘Swan dress’ costume symbolises her youthful vitality and gentleness. The flowing white gown, with its wings and headdress, depicts Snow’s desire to escape the restrictive confines of life with her stepmother, Queen Clementianna.

Accompanying this costume is the ‘Rabbit suit’ costume worn by Prince Alcott, chosen for him by the queen, who is trying to charm the prince into marriage. She attempts to flatter him by saying, ‘In folklore, the rabbit is known to use cunning and trickery to outwit his enemies’. With its prominent bunny ears and lopsided top hat, Prince Alcott concedes that he ‘looks ridiculous’ when dancing with Princess Snow.

Tarsem Singh (director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Tricorne Costumes (costumier), United States est. 2000 / ‘Swan dress’ costume from Mirror Mirror (2012) installed in ‘Fairy Tales’, Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Brisbane 2023 / Silk, synthetic tulle, plastic, metal, nylon, feathers, resin / Collection: The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles / Photograph: C Callistemon © QAGOMA
Tarsem Singh (director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Carelli Costumes (costumier), United States est. 1982 / ‘Rabbit suit’ costume from Mirror Mirror (2012) installed in ‘Fairy Tales’, Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Brisbane 2023 / Silk, polyester, cotton, silk jacquard, synthetic fur, synthetic velvet, leather, rhinestones / Collection: The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles / Photograph: N Umek © QAGOMA
Tarsem Singh (Director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (Designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Production still from Mirror Mirror (2012) / © 2012 UV RML NL Assets LLC. / Photograph: Jan Thijs / Image courtesy: Relativity Media

Eiko Ishioka (designer) ‘Wedding dress’ & ‘Wedding suit’ costumes

Princess Snow’s blue wedding gown features a burst of orange sleeves and an oversized bow at the back, complementing Prince Alcott’s tasselled wedding attire. Both costumes signify a new, independent future, free of the clutches of the soon-to-be-dead Queen Clementianna. In the film, the princess is wearing this gown as she begins her new life with a Bollywood-inspired dance — a nod to the contemporary, fractured nature of the tale and the cultural heritage of the director.

Tarsem Singh (director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Tricorne Costumes (costumier), United States est. 2000 / ‘Wedding dress’ costume from Mirror Mirror (2012) installed in ‘Fairy Tales’, Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Brisbane 2023 / Silk, synthetic, cotton / Collection: The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles / Photograph: C Callistemon © QAGOMA
Tarsem Singh (director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Carelli Costumes (costumier), United States est. 1982 / ‘Wedding suit’ costume from Mirror Mirror (2012) installed in ‘Fairy Tales’, Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Brisbane 2023 / Silk, cotton, synthetic, leather, rubber, plastic, metal / Collection: The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles / Photograph: C Callistemon © QAGOMA
Tarsem Singh (Director), India/United States b.1961 / Eiko Ishioka (Designer), Japan 1938–2012 / Production still from Mirror Mirror (2012) / © 2012 UV RML NL Assets LLC. / Photograph: Jan Thijs / Image courtesy: Relativity Media

TheFairy Talesexhibition is at Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), Australia from 2 December 2023 until 28 April 2024.

Fairy Tales Cinema: Truth, Power and Enchantment‘ presented in conjunction with GOMA’s blockbuster summer exhibition screens at the Australian Cinémathèque, GOMA from 2 December 2023 until 28 April 2024.

The major publication Fairy Tales in Art and Film’ available at the QAGOMA Store and online explores how fairy tales have held our fascination for centuries through art and culture.

‘Fairy Tales’ merchandise available at the GOMA exhibition shop or online.

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For the love of it: Curator picks for 2024

 

On the last Wednesday of each month of 2024 the Australian Cinémathèque curatorial team present ‘For the love of it: A curator’s pick’ These films which have shaped the way they think about cinema — unbounded by theme, genre, or era, this eclectic selection ranges from guilty pleasures to Palme d’Or winners, most of which have never screened at QAGOMA.

On 27 March, Rosie Hays will present Underground (1995), Emir Kursturica’s raucus, circus-esque reflection on survival in times of war, which follows a community who move underground in war-torn Sarajevo.

In an equally vibrant screening, Rob Hughes has selected The Eight Diagram Pole Fighter (1984). This pinnacle of Hong Kong action cinema features one of the most extraordinarily choreographed fight sequences in cinema history, and will screen on 24 April.

Amanda Slack-Smith’s pick for 29 May is Boaz Yakin’s neo-noir Fresh (1994). Set in the slums of New York City, this gritty film applies the logic of chess to find a path through the injustices faced by contemporary African-American communities.

By mid-year, Lynne Ramsay’s, mesmeric Morvern Callar (2002), will be introduced by Sophie Hopmeier on 26 June. This enigmatic tale of mourning and reinvention is a tour de force of sensory cinema.

March | Underground (1995) M

Emir Kursturica’s meditation on war and the whirlwind of being caught in its tumult beats with a raucous and ecstatic heart. In Sarajevo, in the former Yugoslavia, a band of people head underground to live in a cellar seeking safety from the political corruption and conflict raging through the ravaged city. A moment of refuge becomes 20 years of life as they are convinced the war has not ended. Weddings, celebrations, parades and all the highs and lows of the human condition continue on in their self-imposed exile. The film is driven by Goran Bregović’s unruly, vital score that blends Gypsy and Balkan brass with punk sensibilities. A tour de force of the brutal, bombastic and beautiful motivations between people, Underground won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1995.

6.30pm, Wednesday 27 March 2024

Production still from Underground (1995) / Director: Emir Kusturica / Image courtesy: Newen Connect

April | The Eight Diagram Pole Fighter (1984) M

Partway through the production of this martial arts epic from the legendary Shaw Brothers studio, lead actor Alexander Fu Sheng was killed in a car accident. Filming was halted and the script re-written by its pioneering director-choreographer Lau Kar-leung, who shaped the film into an enthralling treatise on rage, vengeance and mourning – culminating in arguably the most extraordinary action climax ever captured on celluloid. One of the highest peaks of Hong Kong cinema, The Eight Diagram Pole Fighter is a stunningly choreographed, potently realised showcase of the depths of the soul and the upper limits of what the human body can achieve.

6.30pm, Wednesday 24 April 2024

Production still from The Eight Diagram Pole Fighter (1984) / Director: Lau Kar-Leung / Image courtesy: Celestial Pictures

May | Fresh (1994) MA15+

Boaz Yakin’s Fresh is a coming-of-age story and gritty tale of crime and retribution in the slum neighbourhoods of New York City. Fresh (Sean Nelson) is a tough 12-year old who plans on surviving his current situation. While living in foster care with his Aunt and sister Nichole (N’Bushe Wright), he deals drugs for local gangster Esteban (Giancarlo Esposito) and saves the money. Wise beyond his years, Fresh decides to use the logic of chess learnt from his estranged father (Samuel L Jackson), to form a strategy that might help him achieve his ultimate goal. Incisive and packing an emotional pull, Fresh is a riveting and entirely unique neo-noir that situates the genre within a contemporary African-American experience.

6.30pm, Wednesday 29 May 2024

Production still from Fresh (1994) / Director: Boaz Yakin / Image courtesy: Studio Canal Australia

June | Morvern Callar (2002) M

Lynne Ramsay’s enigmatic adaption of Alan Warner’s novel traces the actions of Scottish supermarket worker Morvern Callar (Samantha Morton) following the death of her boyfriend. Moved according to her own strange logic and (a)moral code, Callar is a serene and inscrutable figure. Whilst Morton’s stripped back performance highlights a state of disconnection, we are drawn in through her character’s rich sensory world. Ramsay’s exquisitely shot and soundtracked film is a masterwork of visual atmosphere, touching us though the substance and texture of images, which envelop us in sensations which make us experience the world around us anew.

6.30pm, Wednesday 26 June 2024

Production still from Morvern Callar 2002 / Director: Lynne Ramsay / Image courtesy: Company Pictures

July | The Taste of Tea (2004) 18+

August | The Heartbreak Kid (1972) M

September | P’tit Quinquin (2014) 15+

December | Visages Villages (Faces Places) (2017) G

The Australian Cinémathèque
The Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) is the only Australian art gallery with purpose-built facilities dedicated to film and the moving image. The Australian Cinémathèque at GOMA provides an ongoing program of film and video that you’re unlikely to see elsewhere, offering a rich and diverse experience of the moving image, showcasing the work of influential filmmakers and international cinema, rare 35mm prints, recent restorations and silent films with live musical accompaniment by local musicians or on the Gallery’s Wurlitzer organ originally installed in Brisbane’s Regent Theatre in November 1929.

Featured image: Production still from Fresh (1994) / Director: Boaz Yakin / Image courtesy: Studio Canal Australia 

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