Back in time: Early Brisbane watercolours

Together with drawing, watercolour was most often the medium of choice for documenting the early years of settlement in Queensland, especially to depict the landscape, chosen for its ability to record fine detail, evoking atmosphere, and most favoured for its portability and convenience. In this watercolour Farm landscape with colonial homestead 1888 Robert S (Saunder)…

A nostalgia for Queensland’s pastoral past

Rose Simmonds’ photography has an important position in the Queensland Pictorialist photography movement. Emerging directly from the International Pictorialist movement which began in England and France at the end of the nineteenth century, local practitioners of this style continued to work in a manner which encouraged the acceptance of photography as a valid art-form. To…

Mysterious and mundane: The art of Jeffrey Smart

The year 2021 marks one hundred years since the birth of Australian artist Jeffrey Smart (1921-2013). To celebrate we delve into two of his works currently on loan to the National Gallery of Australia for his major exhibition. One of Australia’s most celebrated artists, he sought inspiration from the world around him. DELVE DEEPER: Jeffrey Smart…

Ceramic installations evoke the landscape from which they are produced

Australian artist Yasmin Smith is known for her research-based ceramic installations that formally and chromatically evoke the landscape from which they are produced. As part of her investigative method, Smith gathers natural materials and, through analysis, determines how she can harness their chemical properties. Key to the artist’s process is burning plant material as a…

Contemporary Ceremonial art from Aurukun

In the early 2000s, senior Wik and Kugu law men from the Aurukun region on the west coast of Cape York Peninsula, Far North Queensland, pioneered a significant contemporary movement: They reimagined their ceremonial visual traditions as contemporary art. Embodying ancestral narratives in a way that maintains spiritual and historical connections between the past and…

Back in time: Max Dupain’s Anzac Square, Brisbane

In 1928 a competition for the design of a Shrine of Remembrance (illustrated) in Brisbane was won by Sydney architects Buchanan and Cowper. Construction proceeded over the following two years with Anzac Square opening on Armistice Day in 1930. The Shrine honours the men and women of Queensland who served abroad and at home in…