Goldfield brooches: Uniquely Australian

These intriguing group of brooches, made by unknown jewellers, that were produced in the Australian goldfields, circa 1880–1915 are a peculiarly Australian innovation. These elegant pieces, which are made from gold, gold nuggets, quartz and garnet, employ mining motifs such as picks, shovels, buckets and prospector’s pan. Following significant discoveries of gold in Australia in…

A Singular Vision: Supporting the Collection

Since around 1985, local arts, cultural and educational programs have benefited significantly from the unassuming and intelligent philanthropy of Margaret Mittelheuser AM (1931–2013) and Cathryn Mittelheuser AM, and since 2001 over 100 works have been acquired for the Collection through the generous patronage of sisters, placing them among the Gallery’s most consistent and longstanding donors.…

‘Room with a visitor’: A poster for social distancing

In welcoming visitors back to the Gallery, we’ve assembled a group of large-scale works of art at the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) that reflect on the easing of an unprecedented period of social restrictions. One such work is Australian artist Brian Dunlop’s Room with a visitor, though painted in the 1970s it could act…

National Wattle Day: A celebration of a floral emblem

In 1988, the year of Australia’s bicentenary, the Golden Wattle (Acacia pycnantha) was officially gazetted as Australia’s national floral emblem, enjoying a popular acceptance as the national flower long before then. We’ve been celebrating the Wattle for different reasons over the last century, and this year for the first time on Monday 31 August, Brisbane…

Daniel Boyd , Kudjla/Gangalu people , Australia b.1982 / Untitled (HNDFWMIAFN) (detail) 2017

In Daniel Boyd’s works, Australian history is re-told

Daniel Boyd, born in Cairns, Queensland, is an artist of both Aboriginal and South Sea Islander heritage, whose works often deal with the complexity of the history of South Sea Islander labour in Queensland and its legacy. This is one of our state’s most important historical narratives, with some 62 000 labourers brought to Queensland…

Meet our quirky Aurukun Camp dogs

Wood carving is an important ceremonial art in Aurukun, a town and coastal locality in western Cape York Peninsula, North Queensland. Major sets of carved icons used in public ceremonies in the 1950s and 60s have been collected and are now housed in Australia’s major museums. The renaissance of art in the community has centred…