Asia Pacific Triennial: New futures imagined

QAGOMA’s landmark exhibition series, the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT), celebrates its tenth iteration in 2021. APT10 brings together more than 150 artists, collectives and filmmakers to reflect on complex histories, current urgencies and cultural encounters as they imagine a multiplicity of futures. RELATED (Part 1): APT10: Navigating new futures Ways of navigating…

Asia Pacific Triennial: Navigating new futures

For almost three decades, QAGOMA’s landmark exhibition series, the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT) has focused on the art of one of the most socially and culturally diverse regions of the world. Throughout this geographic expanse, the contexts in which art practices emerge are constantly changing in tandem with social and political conditions.…

Between earth and sky: Indigenous contemporary art from Taiwan

A presentation of new work by eight artists from Taiwan’s Atayal, Paiwan and Truku communities, in ‘The 10th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’ (APT10) project Between Earth and Sky offers a glimpse of the vitality and diversity of indigenous contemporary practice in Taiwan. As four decades of martial law in Taiwan were relaxed at…

Uramat Mugas: Uramat Story Songs

Developed in collaboration with Papua New Guinea’s Indigenous Uramat Identity group for ‘The 10th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’ (APT10), the Uramat Mugas (Uramat Story Songs) project immerses the viewer in the mysteries of Uramat ceremony while fostering deeper cultural understanding. The days begin early in Gaulim, the bustling village in East New Britain’s…

Water patterns: A meditative rhythm

Than Sok infuses new meaning into spiritual practices and investigates the ways in which they permeate daily life and vernacular culture in Cambodia. His art explores how Buddhist principles manifest and dictate relationships to community and environment, while being able to question the role of religious ritual and its incumbent sense of morality. Recently Than…

A sense of absurdism: Breakable throwaway objects

Over her long career, Kimiyo Mishima has become one of Japan’s most widely exhibited female ceramic artists, noted for her wry humour and material sophistication. Her background, however, lies not in Japan’s justly honoured disciplines of craft and design but in the avant-garde, accompanied by a persistent fear of being buried in the ever-accumulating castoffs…