Irene Entata: Painted ceramics

Three painted terracotta pots currently on display in Gallery 3 at the Queensland Art Gallery (QAG) by Arrernte–Luritja artist Irene Entata depict three distinct periods in Arrernte artist Albert Namatjira’s life, including the sad circumstances of his death. One of the foremost artists of the Hermannsburg Potters, Irene Entata (1946–2014), is known internationally for her…

Vale: Milton Moon

Renowned Australian potter and educator Milton Moon AM (1926-2019) passed away in September. Born in Melbourne, Moon was introduced to clay in Brisbane through his friends Mervyn Feeney and Harry Memmott at the Sandison’s Pottery in Annerley, and began his 60-year career as a professional ceramicist. In 1959, he held his first solo exhibition of…

LJ Harvey and his school

Lewis Jarvis (LJ) Harvey was the single greatest influence on visual culture in Queensland in the first half of the twentieth century, this important artist and teacher, and his students, highlights why Harvey was such an inspirational figure. LJ Harvey (1871−1949) was a distinguished modeller, woodcarver, potter and teacher active in Queensland during the first…

The full-bodied vessels of the Hermannsburg Potters document their culture

Ntaria, the former Lutheran Hermannsburg Mission, located about 130 kilometres west of Alice Springs, is now home to the Hermannsburg Potters. The Arrernte people from this area – inspired by the example of their forebear, Albert Namatjira – are famous for their watercolours of the desert interior of Australia. When the Arrernte community took responsibility…

Once Neolithic urns now painted vases

Ceramics have played important practical, social, and cultural roles for tens of thousands of years. Early pottery traditions have been studied and admired for their technological advances and remain an indicator of societal evolution, marking the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture. From Neolithic times pottery has incorporated aesthetic modifications, providing the foundation for…

Vale: Gwyn Hanssen Pigott

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott passed away suddenly in London on 5 July 2013, two days after suffering a stroke. She had stayed on there after showing recent work in an exhibition at Erskine, Hall & Coe, the distinguished West End gallery. According to all accounts, she was full of vigour and plans for the future, intending…