Jenny Watson: Private views & rear visions

This year, the QAGOMA Foundation Appeal invites support for the acquisition of leading Australian artist Jenny Watson’s extraordinary Private views and rear visions 2021–22. Until 7 July 2024, visitors to the Queensland Art Gallery can view this important work in Gallery 1.  Flashes of distant memories and glimpses of recent events are writ large in…

Anna Schwartz reflects on Joel Elenberg’s work

During a visit to the Gallery to view works by Joe Elenberg (1948‑80), Australian Gallerist Anna Schwartz reflects on the creativity of the Australian artist and their shared life together, with a focus on QAGOMA’s commanding marble sculpture Totem 1979 (illustrated). Currently on display until 3 August 2025 at the Queensland Art Gallery is Rhinoceros…

Fairy Tales: Life at the margins

In the world of the fairy tale, witches and crones are not the only characters who generate mistrust and fear — ‘others’, outsiders and so-called misfits pushed to the margins of society, figure prominently in many tales. In these stories, people living outside the norm are branded as villains or monsters. The Beast from ‘Beauty…

Fairy Tales: Lost children

Not all those who find themselves deep in the woods have gone there willingly, with lost or abandoned children recurrent characters in fairy tales — at a time when women frequently died in childbirth, their remaining children often faced challenging domestic situations. In ‘Hansel and Gretel’, the siblings are abandoned in the woods by their…

Rosalie Gascoigne: An alternative form of art making

Rosalie Gascoigne (25 January 1917–1999) first came to public attention in the mid 1970s through her installations and boxes of found objects. She is best known, however, for her wall-based assemblages, which brought diverse materials from everyday life into new frames of reference. Gascoigne worked with items that had been discarded and left to weather,…

How do we perceive light, space & colour?

Australian artist Taree Mackenzie creates videos and installations that explore how we perceive light, space and colour. The artist’s ‘Pepper’s ghost’ works stem from the optical illusion of the same name, originally popularised in the 1800s in Victorian stagecraft and entertainment and named after British scientist and inventor John Henry Pepper. Still commonly used in…