Fine Lines: Meticulous brushwork in figurative painting

‘Fine Lines’ presents a selection of the Gallery’s eighteenth- and nineteenth century Indian miniatures alongside works by contemporary artists from India, Pakistan, Iran, Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand. The exhibition traces the application of meticulous brushwork in figurative painting across a broad geography and range of pictorial styles Emerging more than two millennia ago…

The language of nature

Vincent van Gogh (1853–90) and Claude Monet (1840–1926) did more than paint a natural setting, they both celebrated nature. van Gogh’s The Flowering Orchard 1888 was inspired by the provençal sunshine and flowering fields of Arles, where Monet’s lily pad-laden sensation Water Lilies 1916–19 was completed in his own garden at Giverny.  LIST OF WORKS:…

Genre painting: Understanding a moral message

One expects a certain level of seriousness from a masterpiece of art, and traditionally only religious and historical subjects were deemed suitable. However Two Children Teasing a Cat and Broken Eggs shows artists’ continuing captivation with the nuances of everyday life. LIST OF WORKS: Discover all the artworks DELVE DEEPER: More about the artists and…

Visual Storytelling: Designing for European Masterpieces

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind-the-scenes when designing for a major exhibition ― specifically ‘European Masterpieces from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York’ at the Gallery of Modern Art.  Every exhibition starts with the artwork ― in this case 65 superb paintings spanning 500 years ― that offer a breath-taking journey from…

The jewellery in The Fortune-Teller c.1630s

European jewellery of the Renaissance was colourful, opulent and intricate. It was also widely popular, as the portraiture of this time shows the often extraordinary amount a wealthy man or woman might wear. Many great artists of the Renaissance started their careers in goldsmiths workshops — resulting in a familiarity of styles and techniques in…

500 years of music inspired by European Masterpieces

While the masters Rembrandt (1606-69), Turner (1775-1851), Degas (1834-1917) and Monet (1840-1926) were painting their way into art history, European music was also undertaking an evolutionary transformation. Over the 500-year lifespan of ‘European Masterpieces from the Metropolitan Museum of New York’, some of the most famous composers wrote their timeless classics, including Bach (1685-1750), Mozart…