Natalya Hughes: Making sense of images

An eclectic mix of interests and influences fuels QAGOMA’s second Open Studio artist, whose practice foregrounds the decorative arts while exploring the representation of the female body. Bronwyn Mitchell spoke with Natalya Hughes about her early love of fabric, the paintings of Willem de Kooning and the role of curiosity in the initial stages of…

Nicolas Molé: Pulsing life forms are symbols for the forces of nature

Nicolas Molé is internationally recognised for his work in video, television, animation, drawing and sculpture. Born and educated in France, Molé relocated to New Caledonia in 2010 to connect with his extended family and his Kanak heritage on his father’s side. His ambitious practice engages with this heritage and its contemporary articulation. Ils vous regardent…

2020 program announced

QAGOMA launches its 2020 program this summer with a significant thematic exhibition on the centrality of water to human life globally, exploring water’s cultural, ecological and political dimensions. Program highlights in 2020 include a major solo exhibition celebrating the work of Japanese-born, Berlin-based contemporary artist Chiharu Shiota, a spotlight on the artistic legacies of two…

Margaret Olley: A muse and artistic subject for others

Margaret Olley’s friendships with artists are chronicled in their pictures of her, such as William Dobell’s 1948 Archibald Prize–winning painting, works by Russell Drysdale and Jeffrey Smart and, much later, Ben Quilty’s 2011 Archibald Prize–winning portrait. No other subject has won the Archibald twice (self-portraits by Brett Whiteley and William Robinson aside), and the 63-year…

Portrait of Albert Namatjira

A conventional portrait — a seated half-figure painted from life — which is disrupted by the subject’s race. In mid-twentieth-century Australia, Indigenous people had rarely figured in a genre that confirmed the status of ‘elder statesman’ upon its (mainly male) subjects. William Dargie’s Portrait of Albert Namatjira 1956 has subsequently become the most identifiable image…