Women of the Central Desert

To celebrate International Women’s Day, we highlight two large-scale paintings by Indigenous artists from Central Desert communities in South Australia — Wawiriya Burton’s Ngayuku ngura – My Country 2018 and Nellie Ngampa Coulthard’s Tjuntala Ngurangka (Country with Acacia Wattle) 2018 — two vibrant compositions that hum with energy and evoke the colours and heat of…

5 Women artists with a connection to water

From major immersive experiences to smaller-scale treasures by Australian and international artists, our current exhibition ‘Water‘ highlights this precious resource. To celebrate International Women’s Day, we focus on five women artists who reflect on the cultural traditions of water, consider our reliance on water, and examine the environmental and social challenges faced by the world…

Loma Lautour: A rebellious spirit

The QAGOMA Research Library’s current display features the largely forgotten Australian artist Loma Lautour in celebration of International Women’s Day. Known for her versatility as an artist, her work ethic and her unconventional lifestyle, Lautour is an eccentric and engaging personality in Australian art history. Living a bohemian existence in Sydney’s artist community during the…

Japonisme: Japanese aesthetics in France

The influence of Japanese aesthetics in France during the nineteenth century proved pivotal to a number of modern art movements.  To celebrate the artistic intersections between France and Japan, the Gallery presents screens and decorative ware alongside impressionist landscapes and modern works. Coined in 1872 to describe the influence of Japanese art on European artists…

Patachitras: A form of audiovisual communication

Thought to be one of the oldest forms of audiovisual communication, with their traditional presentation involving storytelling and songs, patachitras are deeply embedded in the vernacular traditions of West Bengal. Patachitras or ‘pats’ are scroll paintings from West Bengal, in eastern India, that are intimately bound up with itinerant storytelling and song. Historically, pats were…

Megan Cope’s ‘Re Formation’ takes the oyster shell as its subject

Before colonisation, the coastal shellfish reefs in Brisbane’s Moreton Bay — fostered using aquaculture techniques — were a major source of food for Aboriginal people of the region. Over centuries of feasting, towering middens created from discarded shells and bones were impressive sights on the local islands and beaches of the mainland. Megan Cope’s RE…