Hey sis

Since the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT) began in 1993, the series has been celebrated for its engagement with Aotearoa New Zealand and the wider Pacific. Through the APT, the Gallery has built a collection of vibrant works by Pacific women artists. A significant number of these have been acquired through generous bequests…

Installation of 350 cables imagine rain when caught by sunlight

Kaili Chun is a Kanaka Öiwi artist who lives in the Hawaiian city of Honolulu, on the island of Oahu, the place of her ancestors. Chun is close to her Hawaiian family and holds great respect for the knowledge and values she has inherited, including a strong sense of love and responsibility towards the environment…

15-metre-long bamboo raft references traditional Fijian watercraft

Salote Tawale was born in Fiji and grew up in suburban Melbourne, and works across media to explore and comment on experiences of dislocation specific to living and working as an intersectional person in Australia. A queer woman of colour, Tawale views all of her works — whether they are representational or not — as…

Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner: A spoken-word poet for resilience & hope

Known internationally for its history as a nuclear testing site, and home to one of America’s most advanced military bases, the Republic of the Marshall Islands is also on the frontline of the global struggle against climate change. Yet, intertwined within the narrative of human disregard, and an increasing susceptibility to the dire effects of…

Beacons of hope: 5 indigenous voices

‘The 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’ (APT9) featured a diversity of indigenous voices — the largest contingent in the Triennial’s history — who share a common experience of dislocation through European settler occupation. Brisbane-based Indigenous artist Ryan Presley looks at how the practices of five of these artists engage with the legacy of…