Documenting Queensland’s history through watercolour

Watercolours feature in the earliest records of European exploration and settlement of Australia. Its continuous presence in the history of Queensland art has changed and evolved with shifts in culture, as well as with the demands and innovations of its practitioners. We look at the medium’s important role in enriching Queensland’s visual history. Together with…

Vida Lahey: Known for her distinctive flower studies

Of all the works by (Frances) Vida Lahey (1882-1968), she is best known for her depiction of the weekly wash-day, Monday morning 1912 (illustrated). Known as a painter of oils on a wide range of subjects, she was also recognised throughout her career as a watercolourist of distinction for floral still lifes, therefore we have…

Arrernte watercolour by Lenie Namatjira, Glen Helen Station 2010

Arrernte Watercolours integral in the Namatjira story

The Hermannsburg School of watercolour painting is the longest continuing contemporary Aboriginal art movement, spanning the period from the mid 1930s to today. This important movement was established at Ntaria (Hermannsburg) before moving to Alice Springs, 125 kilometres to the east. Here, the families of the original painters have continued the tradition, living and working…

Transparent: Watercolour in Queensland 1850s-1980s

‘Transparent: Watercolour in Queensland 1850s–1980‘ presents an exploration of the breadth and diversity of watercolours held in the Collection. Watercolours appear in the earliest records of European exploration and settlement of Queensland. This new display demonstrates the medium’s important role in the state’s visual history. Join us at the Queensland Art Gallery on Saturday 22 March…